Jill Miller (CIPD) talked about the challenge of the world of the future, with an ageing workforce (with four generations working side-by-side), with many people with increasing caring responsibilities (for both children and elderly relatives), with changing workplace, and increasing availability of technology. CIPD are looking at what kind of lenses could we use to

Louisa Baczor (CIPD) then reminded us of why the ‘profession for the future’ work is important as a key enabler of championing better work and working lives. Better work and working lives depends on doing good HR, noting that ‘good’ is very context-specific and is ever-changing. CIPD is looking to drive a shift from following so-called ‘best practice’ to leading with a focus on added value. This principles-based approach helps keep a focus on the context and the value that you’re seeking to drive.

CIPD research has been examining moral dilemmas through a number of lenses: Merit, fairness, market, wellbeing, rights, handing down, democracy, character.

Jill Miller then focused on wellbeing, looking a what a healthy workplace looks like. The CIPD well-being pyramids looks at the building blocks:

CIPD well-being pyramid

 

The CIPD are suggesting that there are five domains of well-being:

  • Health (physical and mental)
  • Work (what does good work look like?)
  • Values/principles (leadership, ethical standards, and diversity)
  • Collective/social (employee voice and positive relationships)
  • Personal growth (do we help people be what they can be?).

More information is available in the full CIPD report on well-being.

 

(This was live-blogged during a session at the CIPD Northern Area Partnership in York 17-18 June 2016 – I’ve tried to capture a faithful summary of the highlights for me but my own bias, views – and the odd typo – might well creep in.)

 

Here’s a Storify of the tweets during the session: